Business Sustain-a-Tree Members

We are grateful to all of our Business Sustain-a-Tree Members. Become one today and have your AD featured in MORP’s calendar. This is just one of many benefits. Read the details below.

Sustain-a-Tree AD spots

http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Sustain-a-Tree-AD-spots.pdf

View the Calendar to choose your AD Spot then contact MORP.

2019 MORP CALENDAR Nov11

http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/2019-MORP-CALENDAR-Nov11.pdf

 

morp@montezumaorchard.org     (970) 565-3099     POB 1556, Cortez, Co 81321

MORP Heritage Apple Tree Availability

Ashmead’s Kernel photo credits: MORP 
Baldwin photo credits Out on a Limb
Ben Davis photo credits: MORP
Black Ben Davis photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Blue Pearmain photo credits: Growing with Plants
Bramley photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Cedar Hill Black photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Chenango Strawberry photo credits: MORP
Claygate Pearmain photo credits: MORP
Delicious- Original photo credits: MORP
Early Joe photo credits: Salt Spring Apple Co
Egremont Russet photo credits: Yalca Fruit Trees
Gravenstein photo credits: MORP
Jonathan photo credits: MORP
Milwaukee photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Newtown Pippin/Albemarle photo credits: MORP
Pink Pearl photo credits: MORP
Pitmaston Pineapple photo credits: Bob Embleton, Pitmaston Pineapple for SO7541
Senator/Oliver photo credits: MORP
St Lawrence photo credits: MORP
Smokehouse photo credits: MORP

 

 

Summer Rambo photo credits: MORP
Thunderbolt/Hoover photo credits: MORP
Tom Putt photo credits: MORP
Unknown, DNA tested photo credits: MORP
Vilberie photo credits: Real Cider Co, UK
Wealthy phot0 credits: MORP
Whitney Crab photo credits: MORP
Winter Banana photo credits: MORP
Wolf River photo credits: MORP
Yellow Bellflower photo credits: MORP
York Imperial photo credits: MORP

Attend a MORP Heritage Apple Tree Sale

Mobile Cider Press Pilot

For the first time since Mountain Sun Juice closed its Dolores doors 14 years ago, local apple juice shipped out of Montezuma County in October, 2016. Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project produced and sold 2,200 gallons of Montezuma Valley Heritage Blend raw apple juice to hard cider makers in Denver, Boulder and Cortez. MORP used proceeds to purchase local heirloom apples, engage Montana’s NW Mobile Juicing, lease cold storage and processing facilities, ship juice and coordinate the project. Funded in part by a recently awarded USDA Local Food Promotion Program grant, MORP undertook this project to evaluate whether mobile juicing can help fruit growers reach juice markets. With the preponderance of juice apples in our orchards, market opportunity exists not only for hard cider, but for our fresh juice as well. Wouldn’t it be great if local apple juice could again be available in our own community?

We learned some valuable lessons in piloting this project. One of the most surprising was that health and juice regulations would not allow juice pressed on a mobile processor to be sold wholesale or retail, even when pasteurized. So we turned our efforts to press juice for hard cider which is exempt from regulations as fermentation effectively kills pathogens.

In order for Ryal Schallenberger of Montana’s Northwest Mobile Juicing to bring his mobile juice press to Montezuma County, MORP needed to guarantee we would have 800 bushels of apples to press. Knowing there was a bumper crop on the trees, and that one orchard alone could produce 800 bushels, we said sure; and when Ryal set a date in mid-October, a 12-day crash-course on juice manufacturing ensued.

MORP set a goal to pick 100 bushels a day. After our first day yielded 20 bushels, albeit with only three pickers, we got nervous. MORP put out a call to pay fruit-growers for picked and delivered apples, volunteer picking crews were organized and seven orchard owners opened their gates to mostly complete strangers. Over the course of eight days, 32 volunteers and four orchard owners picked, shook, and packed 32,000 pounds of apples. Over and over we heard old-timers recount, “on a good day, so-and-so could hand-pick 100 bushels”. We were humbled by our fruit-growing pioneers.

Picking apples was one thing. What about selling juice? How would we price juice in a market ranging from $1.50 to $9.00/gallon? Where exactly does one put 800 bushels of apples and how do they get there? Furthermore, how do we move a tote of juice weighing 2,600 pounds, and how do we get six of them to Denver? Thanks to years of getting to know old orchards, their people, and folks in the cider business, we knew who to ask. The juice sold out, and box-by-box, MORP purchased and borrowed wooden fruit crates, 20-bushel bins and milk crates. We borrowed trucks, trailers, barns, rented a loader and leased a forklift, tractor, warehouse and cold storage from Russell Vineyards to finish the job. Well, almost. There was still that question of getting 10,400 pounds of juice to Denver, after numerous unsuccessful attempts at sourcing a refrigerated truck. But as luck would have it, Lang Livestock had just purchased a truck from our friends at Geisinger Feed. They shipped the juice on an open-air flatbed at night to keep it cool. How happy we were envisioning a 75’ Kenworth semi delivering Montezuma Valley Heritage Blend apple juice in downtown Denver early the next morning. Next time, we envision the truck being full.

MORP is grateful for everyone’s generosity and confidence, and the true community effort it took to accomplish this project. Let us do it again!

Completed Needs Assessment to study feasibility of MORP purchasing a mobile press for use in our heritage orchards:

CapLog - MORP - Needs Assessment - Final - Updated Jan 17
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/CapLog-MORP-Needs-Assessment-Final-Updated-Jan-17.pdf

 

 

mobile press

MORP DNA Results of Historic Apple Trees

 

MORP DNA results of 489 apple leaf samples collected by MORP and submitted to the USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Genetic Resource Preservation for identification, sorted by name. Click the arrows at the bottom of the document to scroll through all pages or click the link to see full document. MORP DNA Results_name
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/MORP-DNA-Results_name.pdf

MORP DNA results of 489 apple leaf samples sorted by tree ID number. Click the arrows at the bottom of the document to scroll through all pages or click the link to see full document. MORP DNA results_treeID
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/MORP-DNA-results_treeID.pdf 

Details:

  • 58 named cultivars
  • 34 unknown cultivar matches to other samples – likely named cultivars not in ARS dataset
  • 103 unique unknown cultivars – some are likely seedlings. However, MORP took care to collect from grafted – not seedling trees – so many of these unique unknowns are also likely named historic cultivars not listed in the ARS dataset
  • 195 cultivars in total out of 489 MORP samples

Testing made possible by a 2015 Colorado USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant award to MORP

MORP Old-Fashioned Newsletter, Fall 2016

 

MORP Heritage Apple Trees

Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project (MORP) presents two annual events where you may purchase heritage apple trees. Mark your calendars for the annual Heritage Apple Tree Sale on the third SAT in June, and the annual Orchard Social and Harvest Festival on the second SAT in October. In between events, you may schedule a special visit to the MORP nursery when you buy 10 trees or more.  

Choose rare apple varieties hand-grafted by MORP. Proceeds benefit the establishment of school, community, and public orchards by growing and donating these rare genetics across Colorado, made possible by a USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant Award. Contact us if you think your organization may qualify for donated trees. The orchard site must be a public or community space with good wildlife fence, water, and labor to care for the trees. So far this year, tree sales have raised over $17,000 towards MORP’s orchard and “re-orcharding” program! Lucky for the general public, hundreds of trees remain to choose from. See here for our current availability list.  Please note that donated trees are selected from a separate list.

Trees are $50. Did you know that MORP members receive $10 off each heritage tree purchased, qualify for an additional bulk tree discount (buy 30 or more trees and get $20 off each tree), and receive special member-only invites to tree sales? Not a member yet? Become one today We thank you.

 Directions to the MORP nursery are 17312 RD G, Cortez CO 81321. From the highway 491 turnoff just south of Cortez drive west for 7.5 miles on county road G (McElmo Canyon road). Nursery is on the south or Ute Mountain side of the road. The turn-around is a three point turn for standard sized vehicles. By appointment only. Minimum 10 tree purchase.

MORP tree list 10_18_17

http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/MORP-tree-list-10_18_17.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Harvest Fest & Orchard Social, Oct 8, 2016

JOIN US on October 8 from 10 to 4! Sign up to attend one of the hard cider tastings (1 or 2 p) at the FREE Orchard Social by pre paying at our Paypal Button at our website – with cider tasting and time – in the memo line, $15 members, $20 non-members; or send us an email to get on the list: morp@montezumaorchard.org 

dcc-harvest-festival-2016

Old Colorado Apples

OLD COLORADO APPLES

MORP is researching old Colorado apples and creating an Old Colorado Apples list. By searching historical books, reports and records, we have so far documented 436 varieties of apples that were once grown in Colorado. Some of the apples on this list we see still growing in our landscape on trees up to 100 years old or older. Others, nearly 50% of the list, are now considered lost/extinct. But we will keep looking for them.
A few details from the list of Old Colorado Apples:

State-Wide Context:

  • 64 varieties, 15%, are Common—10 or more mail order sources carry them; these varieties are NOT commonly found in nurseries, but can be found with specialty nurseries and collectors.
  • 55 varieties, 13%, are Rare—4 to 9 mail order sources carry them
    108 varieties, 25%, are Endangered—1 to 3 mail order sources; we work to get our hands on these apples and increase their numbers before they end up on the lost list
  • 205 varieties or 47% are Lost—considered Extinct; MORP has rediscovered two lost varieties – the Colorado Orange and the Cedar Hill Black apples

This great diversity disappeared not because these varieties did not grow well here; rather because many were simply not shiny red apples representing the standard of the time. We work to return as many of these varieties as we can to Colorado orchards. To be successful, we will need you to plant diversity in YOUR orchards— as was tradition a century ago.

Montezuma County Context:

Approximately 32 varieties of apples have been identified (or tentatively identified) thus far by MORP in Montezuma County orchards planted pre 1922. When compared to the number of varieties documented here in our SW district on the 1922 Sandsten survey, we find that 65% of that diversity is still found in our area’s oldest orchards! Yet, this diversity is hanging on a limb, so to speak, and preserving it before it is gone is what MORP works to do.

Documenting the diversity lost, is another form of preservation, even if less rewarding. When compared to the 436 some varieties of apples that were introduced to the State of Colorado by 1922, Montezuma County of today represents an estimate of 7% of that total state-wide diversity. From our observations we predict this is a much higher number than elsewhere in the state; yet a representation of the devastating loss of diversity that occurred in Colorado and across the country over the last century.

Please be patient as we graft and build our inventory of Colorado heritage apples. Our  tree sales offer a limited selection of these heritage trees; including other endangered and rare apple varieties, some prized for cider.