Gold Medal Orchard

11449 gold medal
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/11449-gold-medal.pdf

HISTORIC GOLD MEDAL ORCHARD

Remembering Our Past, Envisioning The Future

 The historic Gold Medal Orchard, located in McElmo Canyon where it joins Trail Canyon, represents one of hundreds of remnant historic orchards located in Montezuma County and across Colorado. First planted in 1890 by James Giles, the orchard soon earned its name by winning a gold medal for the quality of its apples and peaches at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904.

Remaining on-site are several old apple, pear, and quince trees, portions of the historic orchard fence; and under the grand cottonwoods are two historic homes with sheds and a privy.

When you visit, close your eyes and imagine what you would have seen while standing here at the turn of the 20th century. Fruit trees spread across the canyon floor, pink, white, and red blossoms snowing down in the spring, limbs heavy with crops throughout the summer and fall. Apples, peaches, apricots, pears, cherries, and plums ripening in the warm sun and cool evenings in the perfect location to grow beautiful and flavorful fruit.

Time passed, the trees grew into their grandeur, and then slowly faded into the landscape. Over 100 years later, only a few historic trees remain, hardy remnants of the orchard’s former glory. Heritage fruit varieties were lost, and the story of the Gold Medal Orchard and its prize-winning fruits was nearly forgotten.

Today, the story of the Gold Medal Orchard is remembered by the Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project (MORP) through its work to preserve Colorado’s fruit-growing heritage. In 2015, the orchard was listed as one of Colorado’s Most Endangered Places by Colorado Preservation, Inc. (CPI). MORP works with the Kenyon family to have it become a Saved Site. In 2019, this project was awarded an Endangered Places Progress Award by CPI at the Dana Crawford & State Honor Awards. 

When you are at the orchard, open your eyes wide and take a good look at the roughly 400 fruit trees growing before you. They represent rare fruit genetics (primarily apples) that were grafted by MORP from this and other historic Colorado orchards. Envision these young trees of old genetics reaching their prime, and then still growing another hundred years from now. Gifts of our fruit-growing pioneers passed down by MORP for future generations to taste and preserve.

You are invited to share in this vision by becoming a Sustain-a-Tree Member of MORP.

Please contact MORP via email to visit the orchard.

Interpretive signs paid for in part by History Colorado, State Historic Fund.

Gold Medal Orchard interpretive sign http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/11449-gold-medal.pdf

 

Business Sustain-a-Tree Members

We are grateful to all of our Business Sustain-a-Tree Members. Become one today and have your AD featured in MORP’s calendar. This is just one of many benefits. Read the details below.

Sustain-a-Tree AD spots

http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Sustain-a-Tree-AD-spots.pdf

View the 2019 Calendar. Contact MORP to save a spot for your business in 2020!

2019 MORP CALENDAR web

http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/2019-MORP-CALENDAR-web.pdf

morp@montezumaorchard.org     (970) 565-3099     POB 1556, Cortez, Co 81321

MORP Heritage Apple Tree Availability

Attend a MORP TREE SALE EVENT or schedule appointment to visit.

American Summer Pearmain photo credits: MORP
Arkansas Black photo credits: MORP
Ashmead’s Kernel photo credits: MORP
Baldwin photo credits Out on a Limb
Ben Davis photo credits: MORP
Bietgheimer photo credits: MORP
Black Ben Davis photo credit: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Black Oxford photo credits: Out on a Limb CSA
Blue Pearmain photo credit: Growing with Plants
Bramley photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Chenango Strawberry photo credits: MORP
Claygate Pearmain photo credits: MORP
Crimson Beauty photo credits: MORP
Duchess of Oldenburg photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Early Joe photo credits: Salt Spring Apple Co
Egremont Russet photo credits: Yalca Fruit Trees
Esopus Spitzenburg photo credits: MORP
Fameuse/Snow photo credits: MORP
Folsom no photo avail.
“Gold Medal” Wolf River photo credits: MORP
Golden Delicious photo credits: MORP
Golden Russet photo credits: MORP
Gravenstein photo credits: MORP
Hall Keeper no photo avail.
Hudsons Golden Gem photo credits: MORP
Jonathan photo credits: MORP
King of the Pippins photo credits: MORP
Kingston Black photo credits: MORP
MacIntosh Red photo credits: MORP
Milwaukee photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Nero photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Newtown Pippin/Albemarle photo credits: MORP
Niedzwetskyana photo credits: Trees of Antiquity
Northern Spy photo credits: Virginia Vintage Apples
Northwest Greening photo credits: MORP
Orleans Reinette photo credits: Eat like None.com
Paragon/Black Twig photo credits: MORP
Pink Pearl photo credits: MORP
Pitts Bitter photo credits: Clear Fork Cider
Praire Spy photo credits: MORP
Purple Mountain Majesty photo credit: MORP
Red Astrachan photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Richards Graft photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Salome photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Senator/Oliver photo credits: MORP
Smokehouse photo credits: MORP
St Lawrence photo credits: MORP
Summer Rambo photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Thunderbolt/Hoover photo credits: MORP
Transcendent Crab / “Jasper Hall Jelly Crab” photo credits: MORP
Vilberie photo credits: Real Cider Co, UK
Wagener photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
Wealthy photo credits: MORP
Whitney Crab photo credits: MORP
Wildlife Tree photo credits: MORP
Willow Twig photo credits: Virginia Vintage Apples
Winter Banana photo credits: MORP
Wolf River photo credits: MORP
Yellow Transparent photo credits: USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
York Imperial photo credits: MORP

Mobile Cider Press Pilot

For the first time since Mountain Sun Juice closed its Dolores doors 14 years ago, local apple juice shipped out of Montezuma County in October, 2016. Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project produced and sold 2,200 gallons of Montezuma Valley Heritage Blend raw apple juice to hard cider makers in Denver, Boulder and Cortez. MORP used proceeds to purchase local heirloom apples, engage Montana’s NW Mobile Juicing, lease cold storage and processing facilities, ship juice and coordinate the project. Funded in part by a recently awarded USDA Local Food Promotion Program grant, MORP undertook this project to evaluate whether mobile juicing can help fruit growers reach juice markets. With the preponderance of juice apples in our orchards, market opportunity exists not only for hard cider, but for our fresh juice as well. Wouldn’t it be great if local apple juice could again be available in our own community?

We learned some valuable lessons in piloting this project. One of the most surprising was that health and juice regulations would not allow juice pressed on a mobile processor to be sold wholesale or retail, even when pasteurized. So we turned our efforts to press juice for hard cider which is exempt from regulations as fermentation effectively kills pathogens.

In order for Ryal Schallenberger of Montana’s Northwest Mobile Juicing to bring his mobile juice press to Montezuma County, MORP needed to guarantee we would have 800 bushels of apples to press. Knowing there was a bumper crop on the trees, and that one orchard alone could produce 800 bushels, we said sure; and when Ryal set a date in mid-October, a 12-day crash-course on juice manufacturing ensued.

MORP set a goal to pick 100 bushels a day. After our first day yielded 20 bushels, albeit with only three pickers, we got nervous. MORP put out a call to pay fruit-growers for picked and delivered apples, volunteer picking crews were organized and seven orchard owners opened their gates to mostly complete strangers. Over the course of eight days, 32 volunteers and four orchard owners picked, shook, and packed 32,000 pounds of apples. Over and over we heard old-timers recount, “on a good day, so-and-so could hand-pick 100 bushels”. We were humbled by our fruit-growing pioneers.

Picking apples was one thing. What about selling juice? How would we price juice in a market ranging from $1.50 to $9.00/gallon? Where exactly does one put 800 bushels of apples and how do they get there? Furthermore, how do we move a tote of juice weighing 2,600 pounds, and how do we get six of them to Denver? Thanks to years of getting to know old orchards, their people, and folks in the cider business, we knew who to ask. The juice sold out, and box-by-box, MORP purchased and borrowed wooden fruit crates, 20-bushel bins and milk crates. We borrowed trucks, trailers, barns, rented a loader and leased a forklift, tractor, warehouse and cold storage from Russell Vineyards to finish the job. Well, almost. There was still that question of getting 10,400 pounds of juice to Denver, after numerous unsuccessful attempts at sourcing a refrigerated truck. But as luck would have it, Lang Livestock had just purchased a truck from our friends at Geisinger Feed. They shipped the juice on an open-air flatbed at night to keep it cool. How happy we were envisioning a 75’ Kenworth semi delivering Montezuma Valley Heritage Blend apple juice in downtown Denver early the next morning. Next time, we envision the truck being full.

MORP is grateful for everyone’s generosity and confidence, and the true community effort it took to accomplish this project. Let us do it again!

Completed Needs Assessment to study feasibility of MORP purchasing a mobile press for use in our heritage orchards:

CapLog - MORP - Needs Assessment - Final - Updated Jan 17
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/CapLog-MORP-Needs-Assessment-Final-Updated-Jan-17.pdf

 

 

mobile press

MORP DNA Results of Historic Apple Trees

 

MORP DNA results of 489 apple leaf samples collected by MORP and submitted to the USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Genetic Resource Preservation for identification, sorted by name. Click the arrows at the bottom of the document to scroll through all pages or click the link to see full document. MORP DNA Results_name
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/MORP-DNA-Results_name.pdf

MORP DNA results of 489 apple leaf samples sorted by tree ID number. Click the arrows at the bottom of the document to scroll through all pages or click the link to see full document. MORP DNA results_treeID
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/MORP-DNA-results_treeID.pdf 

Details:

  • 58 named cultivars
  • 34 unknown cultivar matches to other samples – likely named cultivars not in ARS dataset
  • 103 unique unknown cultivars – some are likely seedlings. However, MORP took care to collect from grafted – not seedling trees – so many of these unique unknowns are also likely named historic cultivars not listed in the ARS dataset
  • 195 cultivars in total out of 489 MORP samples

Testing made possible by a 2015 Colorado USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant award to MORP

MORP Old-Fashioned Newsletter, Fall 2016

 

MORP Heritage Apple Trees

Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project (MORP) presents two annual events where you may purchase heritage apple trees. Mark your calendars for the annual Heritage Apple Tree Sale on the third SAT in June, and the annual Orchard Social and Harvest Festival on the second SAT in October. In between events, you may schedule a special visit to the MORP nursery when you buy 10 trees or more.  

Choose rare apple varieties hand-grafted by MORP. Proceeds benefit the establishment of school, community, and public orchards by growing and donating these rare genetics across Colorado, made possible by a USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant Award. Contact us if you think your organization may qualify for donated trees. The orchard site must be a public or community space with good wildlife fence, water, and labor to care for the trees. See here for our current availability list.  Please note that donated trees are selected from a separate list.

Trees are $50. Did you know that MORP members receive $10 off each heritage tree purchased, qualify for an additional bulk tree discount (buy 30 or more trees and get $20 off each tree), and receive special member-only invites to tree sales? Not a member yet? Become one today We thank you.

 Directions to the MORP nursery are 17312 RD G, Cortez CO 81321. From the highway 491 turnoff just south of Cortez drive west for 7.5 miles on county road G (McElmo Canyon road). Nursery is on the south or Ute Mountain side of the road. The turn-around is a three point turn for standard sized vehicles. By appointment only. Minimum 10 tree purchase.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvest Fest & Orchard Social, Oct 8, 2016

JOIN US on October 8 from 10 to 4! Sign up to attend one of the hard cider tastings (1 or 2 p) at the FREE Orchard Social by pre paying at our Paypal Button at our website – with cider tasting and time – in the memo line, $15 members, $20 non-members; or send us an email to get on the list: morp@montezumaorchard.org 

dcc-harvest-festival-2016