Colorado Heritage Apple Trials Initiative

Colorado Heritage Apple Trials Initiative

http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Colorado-Heritage-Apple-Trials-Initiative-.pdf

MORP Heritage Apple Tree Availability

NOTICE: MORP has waived its minimum tree purchase during the entire month of April in an effort to avoid crowds and reduce spread of COVID-19. Please help us in this effort by selecting and paying for your trees BEFORE you visit the MORP nursery (by appointment only). Send us any questions by email morporchard@gmail.com. We can help you choose a great selection (see updated inventory below)! Once we confirm your  order, please pay at the DONATE button at our website or mail us a check to MORP, POB 1556, Cortez, CO 81321. Finally, schedule a day to pick up your trees by sending us an email of possible dates/times. Once confirmed, MORP will hold your pre-paid order for up to two weeks. No refunds, credit only. When you pick up your trees, please maintain recommended social distancing of six feet. Thank you for your understanding. 

Attend a MORP TREE SALE EVENT (no minimum purchase) or schedule appointment w/ 10 tree NO minimum purchase. Trees are $60. All are hand-grafted and grown naturally using lacewing larvae for pest control in 3 gallon pots averaging about 3 feet tall.  Did you know that MORP members receive $10 off each heritage tree purchased and qualify for an additional bulk tree discount (buy 30 or more trees and get 50% off each tree or $30 each)? Not a member yet? Become one todayWe thank you.  

Heritage Apple Tree Availability click to download excel spreadsheet for information on quantity and rootstock. Availability subject to change. If there are varieties that are listed on excel that do not have photos on this page that means they have sold out.

Tree Guarantee & Planting Advice

MORP DNA Results of Historic Apple Trees

 

MORP DNA results of 489 apple leaf samples collected by MORP and submitted to the USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Genetic Resource Preservation for identification, sorted by name. Click the arrows at the bottom of the document to scroll through all pages or click the link to see full document. MORP DNA Results_name
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/MORP-DNA-Results_name.pdf

MORP DNA results of 489 apple leaf samples sorted by tree ID number. Click the arrows at the bottom of the document to scroll through all pages or click the link to see full document. MORP DNA results_treeID
 http://montezumaorchard.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/MORP-DNA-results_treeID.pdf 

Details:

  • 58 named cultivars
  • 34 unknown cultivar matches to other samples – likely named cultivars not in ARS dataset
  • 103 unique unknown cultivars – some are likely seedlings. However, MORP took care to collect from grafted – not seedling trees – so many of these unique unknowns are also likely named historic cultivars not listed in the ARS dataset
  • 195 cultivars in total out of 489 MORP samples

Testing made possible by a 2015 Colorado USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant award to MORP


Historic Apple Cultivar Identification Using DNA Fingerprinting Techniques by Gayle Volke, USDA-ARS National Laboratory for Genetic Resource Preservation (article from MORP 2016 newsletter) 

Apple cultivars are traditionally vegetatively propagated by grafting; many apple cultivars have been sold and exchanged over the centuries. During the American homestead era, apple trees were planted on properties as part of the process of cultivating the land. Cultivars purchased as grafted trees from nurseries often had desirable traits, such as large, higher quality fruit that could be eaten fresh, stored for extended lengths of time, or used for cider production. Trees planted from seeds often did not exhibit desirable traits for fresh consumption, and were instead used primarily for cider. Many historic apple cultivars remain available today as grafted trees in national and private collections. In fact, DNA genetic fingerprinting techniques have been used to develop a database of fingerprints of materials in the USDA collection for use in unknown cultivar identification.


An informal collaboration among the Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project, historic orchards of Wyoming (both through USDA Specialty Crop Research Grants), Yosemite and Redwood National Parks, as well as El Dorado National Forest is underway to identify locally important historic apple cultivars. This effort seeks to use known historic cultivars in the USDA- ARS National Plant Germplasm System Apple Collection—as well as selected varieties in collections at Washington State University and the Temperate Orchard Conservancy (Oregon)—as standards to determine the identities of unknown apples.


Leaf tissue from key historic apple trees was sent to the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins, Colorado. A graduate student from the University of Wyoming has been extracting DNA from these leaf samples and will be preparing the extracts for fingerprinting analyses. Molecular markers, termed “microsatellites”, will be used to compare the genetic identities of the unknown (or tentatively named) cultivars to those in known collections. We hope to be able to identify many of the grafted materials that were previously unknown. This method of genetic testing will only yield cultivar names for grafted varieties; therefore, historic trees that originated from seedling sources will likely remain unidentified.

Publications that relate to this work are: One is a publication by Kanin Routson, Ann Reilley, Adam Henk and Gayle Volk titled “Identification of Historic Apple Trees in the Southwestern United States and Implications for Conservation” (HortScience 2009. 44:589-594) and another was  published by Gayle Volk and Adam Henk “Historic American Apple Cultivars: Identication and Availability” (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 2016. 141:292-301).

MORP Old-Fashioned Newsletter, Fall 2016

 

MORP Heritage Apple Trees

Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project (MORP) presents three annual events where you may purchase heritage apple trees. Mark your calendars for Heritage Apple Tree Sales on the fourth SAT in APRIL and third SAT in JUNE plus the Orchard Social and Heritage Apple Tree Sale on the second SAT in October. In between events, you may schedule a special visit to the MORP nursery when you buy 10 trees or more.  

Choose rare apple varieties hand-grafted by MORP. Proceeds benefit the establishment of school, community, and public orchards by growing and donating these rare genetics across Colorado, made possible by a USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant Award. Contact us if you think your organization may qualify for donated trees. The orchard site must be a public or community space with good wildlife fence, water, and labor to care for the trees. See here for our current availability list.  Please note that donated trees are selected from a separate list.

Trees are $60. Did you know that MORP members receive $10 off each heritage tree purchased, qualify for an additional bulk tree discount (buy 30 or more trees and get $20 off each tree), and receive special member-only invites to tree sales? Not a member yet? Become one today We thank you.

 Directions to the MORP nursery are 17312 RD G, Cortez CO 81321. From the highway 491 turnoff just south of Cortez drive west for 7.5 miles on county road G (McElmo Canyon road). Nursery is on the south or Ute Mountain side of the road. The turn-around is a three point turn for standard sized vehicles. Google Maps will send you astray. No cell coverage in the canyon. Visit during scheduled tree sale events or by appointment only.